Hugo Frank Wallner Great War Digital Library:

HELP/FAQ

(please click on a question below for insights into the collection)

 

1) How Do I Search the Great War Digital Library (GWDL)?

2) What Special Software Is Required For Using the GWDL?

3) How Was the Great War Digital Library Created? Are the Digital Contents Being Preserved?

4) Why Should I Care About World War I?

5) Who Was Hugo Frank Wallner?

6) To What Extent Can I Use Items In The Collection For My Own Work?

7) What Portability Options Does the GWDL Provide?

8) Am I Able to Tag and Provide Comments On the GWDL?

9) How Do I Contact the Great War Archive?

 

How Do I Search the Great War Digital Library (GWDL)?

 

Browsing: You can get an immediate feel for the site’s content by clicking on the “Browse” button, located just below the GWDL header at the top of the homepage.  With a simple click you are availed to the collection with individual items being listed in alphabetical order by title. Click on any title to access both the item and information about that item (e.g. date, authorship, format, etc.).

Another ideal way to browse the collection is via the carousel occupying the middle section of the homepage. It circulates graphical thumbnails of images from the collection. If you wish to access the record of a given item, simply click on the thumbnail or click on the hyperlink located just below it.

If you are unsure how to embark on your search, you might consult the “Browse These Suggested Topics” section, located near the bottom of the homepage. These are pre-coordinated searches constructed to streamline your searching experience.

Simple/Keyword Searching: The primary entry point to the GWDL is the search box that sits just below the graphical header. You may enter any number of keywords into the box, then click the “search” button to the right of the box.

Boolean operators like “And,” and/or “Or” may also be employed in your search.  Placing “and” between your search terms will recall records that contain both terms (e.g. “American” and “Tanks”). Placing “or” between search terms with recall records with either term (e.g. “American” or “Tanks”).

A few helpful tricks in the use of simple keyword searching involve 1) truncation; and 2) phrase searching. In the case of the former, you may use an asterisk (*) to turn a prefix into a “wildcard.” That said, if one enters the term “tank*” it will recall records with terms like “tanking,” “tanks,” and “tanker.” In the case of the latter, the use of quotation marks around a cluster of words (e.g. “Woodrow Wilson”) will keep those words together, ensuring precision, as opposed to “Woodrow” and “Wilson” being searched as different terms in the same record or other records in the same digital library. 

Once you have captured your results, simply click on the hyperlinked title of the item that interests you to see the full record.

Advanced Searching: to capture even more precision in your search, you may employ the “Advanced Search” option, which is accessible to the right of the blue-colored search button. Once there, you will see a simple search box. To the left of it, you will also see a pull-down menu that allows you to ask the GWDL to 1) Look for “all of the words” entered into the search box; 2) Look for “any of the words” entered into the search box; 3) Look for the “exact phrase” entered into the search box; or 4) Look for “none of the words” entered into the search box. As with the basic search feature, once you have captured your results, simply click on the hyperlinked title of the item that interests you to see the full record.

Once your initial search is complete and you have accrued results, you also have the option to narrow your search.  One way to do so is with the “within results” option, which appears in the global search box at the top of your results page. Simply enter your delimiting terms into the box and your results list will be trimmed according to that search. Another way to narrow your search is by way of the “Narrow your search by” feature, located at the far left shim of the results page. Click on the delimited field and resulting values to narrow your search.

 

What Special Software Is Required For Using the GWDL?

Three file formats require specialized software for use:  .PDF, .WAV, .MP3, .MP4, and Vorbis Ogg

.PDF:  To access this format, you will need to download Adobe Acrobat Reader.  You can do so by clicking HERE.

.WAV:  To access this format, you will need to download Windows Media Player (Download HERE), Quicktime (download HERE), or iTunes (download HERE).

.MP3:  To access this format, you will need to download iTunes (download HERE).

External video was accessed by hyperlink. Versions come as .MP4 and Vorbis Ogg Video. The .MP4 version can be viewed with Quicktime (download HERE) or Windows Media Player (download HERE). Vorbis Ogg format items can be viewed with most media viewing packages.

The GWDL’s images and text and optimized at 100 percent for the latest versions of Apple Safari, Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox.

 

How Was the Great War Digital Library Created? Are the Digital Contents Being Preserved?

The collection’s contents were scanned, downloaded or linked to. Sheet music, postcards, and photographs were scanned, using an EPSON 11000XL flatbed scanner (12 inches x 17 inches), as 24-bit color images at 300 dots-per-inch (dpi) JPEGs. In rare cases they were modified in Adobe Photoshop Elements. Items not taken directly from the Great War Archives and the James C. Scott Collection were extracted via hyperlink (.MP4, Vorbis Ogg) and/or download (.MP3, .PDF, .WAV) from Archive.org (http://www.archive.org). Only items digitized from the Great War Archives are under an active preservation plan. 400 dpi tiff archival images are kept in external hard drives at both the Great War Archives and the Rupert Rhodes Library at University of California, Fair Oaks. Original analog content is stored in Mylar sheeting in vault conditions of 70 degrees Fahrenheit and at 45 percent relative humidity.    

 

Why Should I Care About World War I?

The Great War was a sobering watershed to the start of the 20th-century. It taught us about the pitfalls of careless diplomacy; it exposed the misuse and increased killing power, when placed against primeval battle tactics, of military technology; it was the catalyst for a Mandate System that would cripple the development of so much of the world for decades and decades to come; it was the first truly international conflict that America had ever fought in; it fueled discontent in both Germany and Russia, hatching revolutions and movements that would prime the world for another conflict in 1939; and, it would bring focus to veterans' issues while also hatching health, agriculture and entitlement reforms with results good and bad.  

 

Who Was Hugo Frank Wallner?

This digital library is dedicated to Great War participant Private First Class Hugo Frank Wallner, a Doughboy who went from Sacramento, California, to France's Meuse-Argonne sector, where after being injured on September 27, 1918, died on October 1. He was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and, at the age of 10, moved to Sacramento. It was there that his father was a brewmaster at the City Brewery. Hugo attended Sacramento High School and graduated in 1916 to be a bank teller at the California National Bank. In 1917, he married Miss Freda Caldarella. After Hugo's death, Freda never remarried, passing away in San Francisco in 1980.

 

To What Extent Can I Use Items In The Collection For My Own Work?

All GWDL content falls within the Public Domain as they are items published before 1923 or are Federal/State of California government documents. Please consult the following chart from Cornell University's Peter B. Hirtle for more information on the specifics of Public Domain: http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm.  Although there are no constraints, if you choose to make use an item from the GWDL, we do ask that you cite the material as follows: “From the Hugo Frank Wallner Great War Archive.”

 

What Portability Options Does the GWDL Provide?

At the top of the end record of the item you seek, you will see links for “Reference URL” and “Share.” The former provides a dedicated link and an encoded link for placement within an HTML document. The latter allows you to share the record you find via e-mail and various social media outlets. You may also download and/or print images by way of the “download” and “print” buttons located in the upper, right-hand corner of the viewport that holds your record. 

 

Am I Able to Tag and Provide Comments On the GWDL?

You are able to do both on the GWDL. You can do so by looking to the top of the record of interest, where you will see links for both “Add Tags” and “Comment,” OR look to the bottom of the record, where you will see indicators for both “Tags” and “Comments.”

 

How Do I Contact the Great War Archive?

You may e-mail, call or write the Great War Archive via the following:

  scottjc@uwm.edu

  916.XXX.XXXX

  Hugo Frank Wallner Great War Archive, 1111 Rue de Croix de Guerre, Sacramento, California, 95819

 

 

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